Marsh Rising

One-Night-Only performances of rising talent at The Marsh San Francisco. Marsh Rising presents works in progress that may be ready for an extended run. For information about putting on a Marsh Rising show, e-mail Sharon Eberhardt at sharon@themarsh.org.

unnamedStoryborscht

in The Marsh Cafe!

Written & Performed by Charlie Varon
Wednesday, May 3, 2017 at 7:30pm
3 Hours | 1 Meal Break | Ages 15+
Tickets: $30 – $40 sliding scale
*Please Note: Ticket prices include meal. There are only 20 tickets available, and Marsh passes are not valid for this special event. 

To purchase tickets online, please click on a date below

  • May 3, 2017 7:30 PMStoryborscht 05-03-17 (SF)
AEC v1.0.4

Charlie Varon performs his new story “Back in the World” and serves you a homemade supper. Appetizer! Charlie’s renowned hot borscht! Fruit for dessert! A new, pop-up experience combing storytelling and food in an intimate setting. “Let me feed your body and soul.”

The Story: Back into the World
Adele Kleinberg: Octogenarian, retired social worker, full-time worrier. An unlikely series of events propels Adele out of her worries, out of her retirement home, and out of her retirement.

Charlie’s Borscht:
Hearty, delicious, revivifying – this is hot Russian borscht made with beets, cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, onion, garlic, dill, and parsley. Vegan. Served with sour cream, and bread & butter.

Artist Biography
The San Francisco Chronicle has credited Charlie Varon with ‘redefining the form’ of solo performance. Charlie has been working at The Marsh for 25 years. His award-winning shows, all developed with and directed by David Ford, include Rush Limbaugh in Night School, The People’s Violin, and Rabbi Sam. Charlie has also collaborated on and directed all of Dan Hoyle’s solo shows at The Marsh. Since 2011, Charlie has been working on a series of stories about old jews living at a retirement home in San Francisco. These have been brought to the stage in his solo show Feisty Old Jew (2014) and in Second Time Around (2016), his duet with cellist Joan Jeanrenaud. Storyborscht is the next installment in the series.

You Are Reminded That Your Safety is Your Own unnamedResponsibility

Written & Performed by Janna L. Goodwin
Directed by Lee Massaro
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 7:30pm
75 minutes | No Intermission | Ages 13+
Tickets: $10 – $15 sliding scale

To purchase tickets online, please click on a date below

  • May 10, 2017 7:30 PMYou Are Reminded That Your Safety Is Your Own Responsibility 05-10-17 (SF)
AEC v1.0.4

“I’m traveling on my own, renting a cabin at a normally tranquil spot–that’s called foreshadowing–on the banks of the Big Laramie River at the edge of the Medicine Bow National Forest.”

So begins Janna L. Goodwin’s solo show–a series of misadventures, near-calamities and brushes with death–all of which fill the listener with wonder…as in, “I wonder how any of us survives?” Encounters with wildlife and nature’s fury, human predators, bullies, psychopaths, and the most daunting of all forces–fear itself–all unfold in landscapes of the American West. Goodwin looks for, and ultimately finds, meaning and a sense of belonging (if not security) in human relationships, in stories–and in an acceptance of time, physics, and other comfortingly familiar, observable phenomena and processes.

kate headshotAin’t That Rich

Written & Performed by Kate Robards
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 7:30pm
60 minutes | No Intermission | Ages 13+
Tickets: $10 – $15 sliding scale

To purchase tickets online, please click on a date below

  • May 17, 2017 7:30 PMAint That Rich 05-17-17 (SF)
AEC v1.0.4

“Writer and comedian, Kate Robards, delivers a dazzling solo performance, one as a mesmerizing and powerful as it is funny.” –DC Metro Theatre Arts

“Like a well-made vodka punch, Kate Robards’ well-made story sneaks up on you. It starts out as a lighthearted account of how she married rich and ends up as a discomforting meditation on the relationship between money and self-image. Particularly now, we agonize over issues of money and class and race, her story packs an unexpected wallop.” — DC Theatre Scene

Kate grew up “poor.” She thinks her husband is “rich.” His family says that’s not a nice word. As Kate straddles two different extreme ways of life, she realizes what money can and cannot buy, including the possible salvation for a loved one.