Marsh Rising

One-Night-Only performances of rising talent at The Marsh San Francisco. Marsh Rising presents works in progress that may be ready for an extended run. For information about putting on a Marsh Rising show, e-mail Sharon Eberhardt at sharon@themarsh.org


A Fatal Step

Written & Performed by Jill Vice
Wednesday, October 4, 2017 at 7:30pm
60 minutes | No Intermission | Strictly Ages 13+
Tickets: $10 – $15 sliding scale

To purchase tickets online, please click on a date below:

  • October 4, 2017 7:30 PMA Fatal Step 10-04-17 (SF)
AEC v1.0.4

“A delicious turn on noir, told from the point of view of the femme fatale.” –Winnipeg Free Press

“An impressive array of body language and vocal talent.”Huffington Post

Show Description:

On the heels of her award-winning show, Tipped and Tipsy, BEST-OF-FEST winner Jill Vice returns to The Marsh with a one-woman noir that ain’t just black and white.

A Fatal Step. Sex, Lies, & Podiatry. Sometimes a dame has to take matters into her own hands, but good intentions can lead to…MURDER.

Artist Biography:

Jill Vice is a San Francisco based acting/movement coach & director to many new and unusual solo shows (Marga Gomez’s “Pound”, Elaine Magree’s “Holding the Edge”, Rebecca Fisher’s “The Magnificence of the Disaster”, and Lisa Rothman’s “Date Night at Pet Emergency” to name a few). Her quest is to make theater more physically vibrant. For more information about her coaching services, visit JillVice.com

A San Francisco based solo performer herself, Vice’s previous one woman show, “Tipped & Tipsy” was developed at The Marsh in San Francisco with director David Ford and was praised by critics and audiences for its sold out performances at the 2013 SF Fringe Festival where it won Best of Fest. “Tipped & Tipsy” went on to have an extended run at The Marsh SF and has been touring the United States and Canada ever since.


Return to the Scene of the Crime

Written & Performed by David Kleinberg
Directed by Mark Kenward
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 at 7:30pm
65 minutes | No Intermission | Ages 16+
Tickets: $10 – $15 sliding scale

To purchase tickets online, please click on a date below:

  • October 18, 2017 7:30 PMReturn to the Scene of the Crime 10-18-17 (SF)
AEC v1.0.4

Show Description

David Kleinberg returns to Vietnam for the first time in 50 years to revisit the base camp where his buddies died to perform his acclaimed solo theater work on the Vietnam War, “Hey, Hey, LBJ!” But David’s wife, daughter, and his ex-Vietnam buddies all tell him he’s going to get arrested for trying to stage the work without the Communist government’s approval. David is up every night at 3 looking for the first flight home.

Artist Biography

David Kleinberg has been doing solo theater performance for nine years. “Return to the Scene of the Crime” marks his fourth work. David was an editor and writer at the San Francisco Chronicle for 34 years, including 14 years as editor of the Sunday Datebook. David has also been a stand-up comedian for 10 years, appearing with Robin Williams, Richard Lewis, and Dana Carvey.


Why Would I Mispronounce My Own Name?

Written & Performed by Irma Herrera
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 7:30pm
65 minutes | No Intermission | Ages 14+
Tickets: $10 – $15 sliding scale

To purchase tickets online, please click on a date below:

  • November 15, 2017 7:30 PMWhy Would I Mispronounce My Own Name? 11-15-17 (SF)
AEC v1.0.4

Show Description

What’s in a name? A minefield of misplaced notions–comical, sad, demeaning. Irma’s observations from the front-lines, notes from American history, and laugh out-loud humor allow us to consider what it will take for all of us to get along.

Artist Biography

When Irma Herrera gives her name its correct Spanish pronunciation, some people assume she’s a foreigner. She’s not. Irma proudly claims her Tejano roots and her Mexican and American identity as well as her native languages: Spanish and English. Irma worked three decades as a San Francisco lawyer and journalist. Her solo play Why Would I Mispronounce My Own Name? sheds light and throws shade on our prejudices and assumptions.